the trapeze act

ask.   i'm marie.

southern california. university of california, berkeley. english/rhetoric major. creative writing minor. introspective, perceptive, detail-oriented, memory keeper, sometimes wannabe writer. razor tongue. mostly gold and therefore golden.

memoryorbits.tumblr.com, the writing journal
fandumbtalk.tumblr.com stupid shit fangirl-ish


someone tell me why daily cal’s sex on tuesday columnist is basically a sexist asshole who does not understand how privilege works?

— 1 day ago with 2 notes
creating a hostile environment is unproductive

check your own damn privilege of the knowledge you have and how your own institutions work.

— 1 week ago with 1 note

trancegeminiwithatail:

I think it’s safe to assume that this was a nod to Chlumsky’s character in Hannibal.

I AM OVERLY EXCITED BY SECRET!CROSSOVER.

(omg i wonder what’s gonna happen to miriam lass in hannibal. DDDD:)

— 1 week ago with 1201 notes
Remembering Roger: The Table of Contents | Balder and Dash | Roger Ebert →
— 2 weeks ago
#Roger Ebert 

fionas-gallagher:

Infinite list of TV characters that I adore: Matt Saracen

I gotta get up there in front of everybody and say good stuff about this man. And all I really want to say is ‘Here lies Henry Saracen, his mother annoyed him, his wife couldn’t stand him and he didn’t want to be a dad so he took off to be in the army because that’s the only way he could come up with to get out of here and ditch all your responsibilities and no one could call you out on it and that worked out great so you just decided to enlist four more times and that ended up getting you killed and now here you are. And all you left behind is a mother with dementia, a divorced wife and a son that delivers pizza. Thank you for coming 100 people I do not know.’ You know what the worst part is? Even if I did get up and say all that I don’t even know if I’m saying it to him because I don’t know what’s in that damn box. It’s a closed casket— might be someone else, someone funnier or a bunch of rocks.

CUTIE

— 2 weeks ago with 346 notes
cleolinda:

mylesmcnutt:

I woke up to a text from my brother: “RIPTWOP.”
The loss of Television Without Pity is a difficult one, although not because it interrupts my daily routine: it’s been years since I’ve visited the site regularly, and probably at least a year since I clicked over to any of its coverage or visited its forums (which I haven’t logged into in probably four years or so).
It’s difficult instead for two different reasons. On the one hand, it’s difficult because of the sheer volume of content that will be lost when the site shuts its doors. It has lived on as an archive of week-by-week engagement with television programming, both in its recaps and—especially—in its forums. From a scholarly perspective, this archive has been both a subject of study in and of itself and a space in which other subjects can be studied (I last used the forums to study audience response to dynamics of race in Showtime’s Weeds during its early seasons, for example). The idea that this archive could be lost (to the public, since NBC Universal has announced they’re archiving it but not for public access) is rightfully a point of concern among the site and its followers, and consider this brief overview my commitment to helping with any archival efforts.
However, the other reason the site’s death is so resonant is because its influence spreads so far beyond its content, both in terms of the careers its creators and writers have gone on to have, and the way it has influenced its readers and commenters—that’s me, in this instance—to engage with television in an in-depth way. For as much as the loss of the site’s content is hard to imagine, it’s even more difficult to imagine a world when that content hadn’t existed. Despite largely being marginalized from contemporary television discourse in the post-Bravo acquisition era, the site’s legacy has lived on in ways that make even the death of the post-Bravo Television Without Pity into a meaningful event for reasons beyond the loss of the content itself.
There is no question that Television Without Pity was a substantial influence in how I engage with television, fostering an engagement with the medium that would bleed into my academic work, frame my early days blogging about television, and eventually exist as a foundation for whatever my academic/critical identities have become. I will always hold at least a bit of a—fake—grudge against the site for popularizing the term “Recap” that has become unnecessarily ubiquitous in thinking about episodic television coverage, but at the end of the day Television Without Pity had an immeasurable impact on a generation of readers that have today taken to social media to reflect on its impact.
The site is shutting down because of how many of those remembrances are in the past tense; the site’s legacy will live on because of how many remembrances there are.

I’l say this much—my Hannibal recaps today, and the Lost recaps before that, exist because TWOP solidified the idea of the full-length, in-depth recap in the first place. I won’t say they were the first or only site to do it originally, but I really believe that they established the medium as a full-fledged thing; I’d go over there and read gigantic recaps of shows I never had any intention of watching in the first place. I’ve actually sat here the last month or so telling myself, “It’s okay that the Hannibal recaps go so long, because the TWOP recaps are huge. It’s a legitimate format that people have been using for years now, don’t worry about it.” My entire idea of how to approach writing them came from TWOP—so that’s a drop in the bucket of influence they’ve had. 

(Side note: NBC Universal has since announced that it’ll leave the content public.) 

cleolinda:

mylesmcnutt:

I woke up to a text from my brother: “RIPTWOP.”

The loss of Television Without Pity is a difficult one, although not because it interrupts my daily routine: it’s been years since I’ve visited the site regularly, and probably at least a year since I clicked over to any of its coverage or visited its forums (which I haven’t logged into in probably four years or so).

It’s difficult instead for two different reasons. On the one hand, it’s difficult because of the sheer volume of content that will be lost when the site shuts its doors. It has lived on as an archive of week-by-week engagement with television programming, both in its recaps and—especially—in its forums. From a scholarly perspective, this archive has been both a subject of study in and of itself and a space in which other subjects can be studied (I last used the forums to study audience response to dynamics of race in Showtime’s Weeds during its early seasons, for example). The idea that this archive could be lost (to the public, since NBC Universal has announced they’re archiving it but not for public access) is rightfully a point of concern among the site and its followers, and consider this brief overview my commitment to helping with any archival efforts.

However, the other reason the site’s death is so resonant is because its influence spreads so far beyond its content, both in terms of the careers its creators and writers have gone on to have, and the way it has influenced its readers and commenters—that’s me, in this instance—to engage with television in an in-depth way. For as much as the loss of the site’s content is hard to imagine, it’s even more difficult to imagine a world when that content hadn’t existed. Despite largely being marginalized from contemporary television discourse in the post-Bravo acquisition era, the site’s legacy has lived on in ways that make even the death of the post-Bravo Television Without Pity into a meaningful event for reasons beyond the loss of the content itself.

There is no question that Television Without Pity was a substantial influence in how I engage with television, fostering an engagement with the medium that would bleed into my academic work, frame my early days blogging about television, and eventually exist as a foundation for whatever my academic/critical identities have become. I will always hold at least a bit of a—fake—grudge against the site for popularizing the term “Recap” that has become unnecessarily ubiquitous in thinking about episodic television coverage, but at the end of the day Television Without Pity had an immeasurable impact on a generation of readers that have today taken to social media to reflect on its impact.

The site is shutting down because of how many of those remembrances are in the past tense; the site’s legacy will live on because of how many remembrances there are.

I’l say this much—my Hannibal recaps today, and the Lost recaps before that, exist because TWOP solidified the idea of the full-length, in-depth recap in the first place. I won’t say they were the first or only site to do it originally, but I really believe that they established the medium as a full-fledged thing; I’d go over there and read gigantic recaps of shows I never had any intention of watching in the first place. I’ve actually sat here the last month or so telling myself, “It’s okay that the Hannibal recaps go so long, because the TWOP recaps are huge. It’s a legitimate format that people have been using for years now, don’t worry about it.” My entire idea of how to approach writing them came from TWOP—so that’s a drop in the bucket of influence they’ve had. 

(Side note: NBC Universal has since announced that it’ll leave the content public.

— 2 weeks ago with 385 notes
http://fuckyeahfirefly.tumblr.com/post/81189887767/ennuijolras-okay-so-alan-tudyk-is-at-new →

ennuijolras:

okay so alan tudyk is at new orleans comic con

and someone asked him one of his favorite memories from filming firefly and he told the best story from filming “objects in space”

so basically since wash and zoe and most of the crew are locked in their rooms for the episode,…

ADORABLE

— 2 weeks ago with 5206 notes
How I spent my last spring break as a college student. We all threw up, then slept forever.

How I spent my last spring break as a college student. We all threw up, then slept forever.

— 2 weeks ago with 2 notes
#pc: best friend bobs